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University of Toledo (College of Medicine)




The College of Medicine provides an outstanding education for students interested in becoming physicians and physician-scientists. The integrated curriculum prepares students with knowledge, skill and attitude to practice medicine in the supervised settings of post-graduate residency programs.

The University of Toledo has three hospitals on campus: an acute care teaching hospital, a rehabilitation hospital and a child and adolescent psychiatry hospital. The hospitals' convenient on-campus location make it easy for students in the College of Medicine to do in-patient care rotations.

The University of Toledo's College of Medicine provides an outstanding education for students interested in becoming physicians and physician-scientists. The integrated curriculum in the College of Medicine prepares students with the knowledge, skill, and attitude to practice medicine in the supervised settings of post-graduate residency programs.

The Health Science Campus offers an academic environment that attracts the most high-qualified students and faculty by integrating advanced research, innovative education and patient care.

It has approximately 400 full- and part-time faculty members. More than 1000 area physicians, nurses, physical and occupational therapists and other health professionals serve as advisors and student preceptors.

The Office of Student Life at the University of Toledo recognizes the importance of co-curricular activities in the education of qualified, humanistic health care providers and medical researchers. In order to create an environment in which this is possible, we have adopted the facilitator college approach to student organizations and sponsored activities. This approach establishes a partnership between the OSL and the leaders, members, and advisors of student organizations; implicit in this partnership is the shared responsibility for making informed, reasonable decisions about student involvement.

Consistent with our facilitator approach, the facilitators of recognized student organizations – the membership, the leaders, and the advisors – must accept partial responsibility for decision-making as well as for the inherent risk associated with these decisions.


School name:University of ToledoCollege of Medicine
Address:3045 Arlington Avenue
Zip & city:OH 43614 Ohio
Phone:419-383-4229
Web:http://hsc.utoledo.edu/med
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College of Medicine Courses


YEAR 1 COURSES

* Cell and Molecular Biology : This block includes integrated topics from Biochemistry, Physiology, Microanatomy, Pharmacology and Pathology. The course begins with an introduction to cell structure and function, examining the details of the plasma membrane, cytoskeletal structure and cell organelles. This material includes integrated information about the molecular structure of amino acids, proteins, enzymes and lipids and functional considerations for cell-to-cell communications. It also includes a discussion of the basic tissue types and an introduction to pathologic changes which may affect them. The final portion of this course is dedicated to a discussion of molecular human genetics. The concepts of carcinogenesis, mutagenesis and genetic alteration, as well as an introduction to antineoplastic agents and gene therapy strategies, conclude the material to be presented.

* Integrative Pathophysiology 1 : This course begins in the first semester and extends through both years of the curriculum (33 weeks each year). Students receive cases, which are closely linked to the subject matter. Students spend about one week working independently on the cases, determining the salient features and developing hypotheses pertaining to the mechanisms underlying the selected disease processes. Meeting in-groups of seven to 10, students discuss their findings in the presence of a faculty facilitator in a weekly two-hour session. As a result of the discussion, the students select focused topics (issues) that they believe will help them to understand the disease mechanisms and apply basic science principles to solve the clinical problem. In the next week, students meet with the facilitator to discuss their findings, bring the case to closure and receive the next case. At the end of the course, students should be able to develop hypotheses and a rationale to test the hypotheses to explain normal and/or pathophysiologic mechanisms of disease.

* Human Structure & Development : This block includes integrated topics from Gross Anatomy, Microanatomy and Embryology. The course is designed around a framework based on regional anatomy. In each segment, the appropriate macro-, microscopic and developmental anatomy will be covered. Students accomplish cadaver dissections and microanatomy labs during this block. Throughout the course, there is a strong emphasis on three-dimensional anatomical relationships that is reinforced by small group discussions and demonstrations of regional radiographic imaging. Each unit has clear clinical correlations that are presented to the students in a variety of ways, including panel discussions, small groups, demonstrations and meetings. Students have the opportunity to develop initial physical diagnostic skills in a series of workshops, which correlate surface anatomy with internal structures and normal thoracic, abdominal and ENT exams.

* Fundamentals of Clinical Practice : Fundamentals of Clinical Practice I (FCP) is a year-long course, an introduction to fundamental concepts and skills related to providing medical care. It is composed of units that address specific knowledge and skills related to patient care, communication, and medical practice in the United States. These topics are not isolated but highly integrated with each other and the concept of Professionalism is integral to each of them. Topics introduced in year I will be expanded in the second year.

* Neuroscience

* Behavioral Science

YEAR 2 COURSES :

* Immunity and Infection : This block in Year II includes integrated topics from Immunology, Bacteriology, Virology, Mycology, Parasitology and Molecular Basis of Infectious Diseases. The material is taught using a combination of lectures, small group discussions, case study presentations and individual learning activities. Students experience routine microbiology laboratories. Other learning activities include Patient-Oriented Problem Solving (POPS) packages which are designed to stimulate self-directed study and are followed by small group discussions of the topics.

* Integrative Pathophysiology 2 : This course begins in the first semester and extends through both years of the curriculum (33 weeks each year). Students receive cases, which are closely linked to the subject matter. Students spend about one week working independently on the cases, determining the salient features and developing hypotheses pertaining to the mechanisms underlying the selected disease processes. Meeting in-groups of seven to 10, students discuss their findings in the presence of a faculty facilitator in a weekly two-hour session. As a result of the discussion, the students select focused topics (issues) that they believe will help them to understand the disease mechanisms and apply basic science principles to solve the clinical problem. In the next week, students meet with the facilitator to discuss their findings, bring the case to closure and receive the next case. At the end of the course, students should be able to develop hypotheses and a rationale to test the hypotheses to explain normal and/or pathophysiologic mechanisms of disease.

* Organ Systems : This is the largest block in the second year of the curriculum. Topics are organized as nine organ system units. Within each unit, there is a consideration of the relevant physiology, pharmacology and pathology for that system. Organ system units include, Cardiovascular and Autonomics; Neurological Disease; Respiratory; Renal and Electrolytes; Hematopoietic; Gastrointestinal and Hepatic; Endocrine; Reproductive; Skin and Skeletal.

* Physician, Patient, and Society 2 : This early clinical experience (longitudinal preceptorship) is designed to integrate basic sciences and clinical experiences across Years I and II and thus provides clinical relevance for basic science content. The preceptors are community office-based generalists. Students also meet on a regular basis with their preceptor for small group discussions of patients seen in the office. This block also includes interviewing and communication skills, workshops and the content of the current physical diagnosis course.

THIRD YEAR COURSES

* Internal Medicine Clerkship : The Department of Internal Medicine strives to provide our third year medical students with a broad exposure to the inpatients and outpatient practice of internal medicine. The practice of internal medicine is an in-depth study of the health matters affecting adult patients. This clerkship places emphasis on the acquisition of highly honed skills in medical history taking and physical examination. Students also create lists and develop plans to direct the investigation of patients' medical disorders. This clerkship allows all students to have outpatient experience in community preceptor sites as well as the ambulatory clinics of the University of Toledo's Department of Internal Medicine. Students also have intensive inpatient clinical rotations.

* Family Medicine : The Family Medicine Clerkship is designed to give our students an opportunity to develop the basic knowledge, skills, the principles of practice as well as the physician attitudes essential to the practice of a family physician. This clerkship is community based with a strong emphasis on exposure to a diverse range of the common problems encountered by physicians. The structure of this community centered clinical experience is designed to provide real world experiences as well as the opportunity to master the abilities of a family physician. The goals are achieved with the guidance of experienced family physician preceptors in private offices as well as the academic facilities of the University of Toledo.

* Obstetrics and Gynecology : The Obstetrics and Gynecology clerkship is designed to prepare students to provide students an opportunity to master the knowledge of reproductive physiology, anatomy, management of pregnancy and the common gynecologic problems that affect women patients. The students are carefully preceptored in a variety of learning environments and are tutored in observing in the operating room. There are opportunities for both inpatient and outpatient experiences during this clerkship. A unique part of this clerkship is the regular professors' rounds that are held on a weekly basis which allow students to discuss patient management problems and basic science issues relating to women's health with the chairman of our Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

* Pediatrics : The Pediatric Clerkship prepares students for the care of the unique problems that affect infants and children as well as adolescents. There is a strong emphasis on human biology, growth and development and the principles of early health maintenance. In addition, the impact of the community and society on child health and wellbeing is emphasized. The clerkship focuses on the impact of disease as it affects a developing human and the recognition of common health problems. Students have both inpatient and outpatient experiences which permits exposure to skilled pediatricians in their practice environments. There is regular opportunity for student and preceptor interaction as well as didactic learning sessions.

* Psychiatry : The Psychiatry Clerkship has designed a curriculum to prepare the student to understand and manage the common mental health problems affecting our society. This clerkship is designed to place emphasis on those problems that a primary care physician would most likely encounter in a practice. Emphasis is placed on mental health disorders that afflict a population that is steadily aging. During the course of this clerkship, the students will understand the basic biology and psychological as well as social aspects of their patients' disorders and they will understand some of the medical management that can provide significant relief to patients with psychiatric disorders.

* Surgery : During the Surgery Clerkship, the students will have an opportunity to learn the fundamentals of surgical concepts and to acquire patient management skills. It is not anticipated that significant operative technical skills will be acquired but students are welcomed in the Operating Room where they will be active participants in the operative management of patients under the close supervision of attending physicians and senior surgical residents. Students will also have an opportunity to develop basic clinical judgment skills and analyze common clinical surgical problems. It is anticipated that the student will acquire basic diagnostic capabilities related to surgical problems and be able to develop and organize a plan of assessment and management for the more common surgical disorders.

FOURTH YEAR COURSES

* Neurology : During the Neurology Clerkship, the students will be exposed to opportunities to develop the skills to acquire a complete and detailed neurological history as well as to complete a comprehensive neurological exam of patients. Acquisition of these skills will allow the student to develop an appropriate differential diagnosis for their patients. Also during the clerkship, the student will have an opportunity to review the anatomic basis for neurologic disorders. Students will have an opportunity to assess patients in both the inpatient and outpatient environment, to observe the spectrum of neurodiagnostic studies that are used in the evaluation of patients with neurologic disorders. During this clerkship, students should have the ability to apply the knowledge they have acquired in their basic neurobiology training. By the end of your first and second years of medical school you will be able to understand the mechanism of neurologic disorders.

* Fourth Year Selective and Elective Clerkships : In addition to these required clerkships, students in their fourth year of medical school will have an opportunity for a broad spectrum of choices of elective clerkships. Students are required to complete 28 weeks of elective clerkships. 12 weeks of the elective clerkships must be at the University of Toledo and its associate teaching institutions. In addition, a four-week basic science selective is required. The basic science selective is an opportunity for students to revisit their basic sciences having had exposure to clinical medicine. This is an opportunity for students to solidify and re-integrate basic science into their clinical world.

The remainder of the fourth year of medical school electives can be completed at any medical school in the United States or Canada with the approval of a sponsoring department at the University of Toledo. In addition, students can participate in international clerkships if they are approved by a sponsoring department at the University of Toledo's College of Medicine. This flexibility in the fourth year of the curriculum allows students to have a unique opportunity to tailor their curriculum to their own future medical education and practice needs. We at the University of Toledo believe that this flexibility in our fourth year allows every student to have a unique and self-satisfying curriculum.

During the third and fourth years of medical school, each student is required to complete eight weeks of clinical experience in the Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) of the University of Toledo. This unique clinical environment allows students to participate in clerkships both required and elective in our regional communities. The major advantage of these experiences is to place students in smaller communities in a one-on-one structured relationship with physicians who are practicing in the community. Students find this experience most rewarding since they have a unique opportunity to spend at good deal of time with the preceptor and to have a sense of day-to-day medical practice issues away from the academic medical center.

The third and fourth years of the clerkship at the University of Toledo have as their goal to prepare students for the world of graduate medical education, which a student will enter immediately upon graduation from this medical school. We believe that our students are well prepared for this new part of their medical education. This is evidenced by the wide spectrum of training programs that our students enter upon graduation and the high success rate that our students have in obtaining their choices for graduate training sites.

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