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University of South Carolina (School of Medicine)




A national leader in primary care medical education, the University of South Carolina School of Medicine also sponsors research focused primarily on South Carolina health care needs and provides a wide range of clinical care services to South Carolinians.

In addition to the degree of Doctor of Medicine, the School of Medicine offers the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy in Biomedical Science, Master of Science in Genetic Counseling, Master of Biomedical Science with specialization in Nurse Anesthesia, and Master of Rehabilitation Counseling. A wide variety of residency and fellowship programs is offered in cooperation with affiliated hospitals, and the school sponsors a continuing medical education program for state health care practitioners.

The school's administrative offices and basic science departments, which adjoin the Dorn VA Medical Center, have the advantage of both a beautiful, historic campus and well-equipped, modern laboratories and classrooms. Clinical departments are located on the rapidly expanding USC School of Medicine campus at Richland Medical Park in central Columbia.
Affiliated hospitals are the Byrnes Center for Geriatric Medicine, Education, and Research, the Dorn VA Medical Center, the Greenville Hospital System, the William S. Hall Psychiatric Institute, Moncrief Army Hospital, and Richland Memorial Hospital. The school also collaborates closely with state agencies involved in health service delivery.

The mission of the University of South Carolina School of Medicine is to improve the health of the people of the state of South Carolina through the development and implementation of programs for medical education, research, and the delivery of health care. School of Medicine programs will be developed in collaboration with affiliated institutions, and allocation of resources will be based upon the physician manpower and health care needs of South Carolina, the effectiveness and efficiency of specific programs, and the accreditation requirements of all appropriate organizations.

Education. Medical education and graduate education at all levels are conducted in a highly personal atmosphere which emphasizes a balance among scientific disciplines, humanistic concerns, and societal needs.

Research. Research in the basic biomedical sciences, in the clinical sciences, and in the delivery of health care is pursued for excellence in medical education, for development and application of new knowledge, and for nurturance of intellectual curiosity among faculty and trainees.

Service. Faculty service is developed in order to maintain superior clinical skills, to enhance educational programs, to make comprehensive outpatient and inpatient care available to patients, to secure resources necessary to support education and research, and to provide consultation to physicians, other health care professionals, and affiliated health care agencies and institutions.

Medical Students earn the Doctor of Medicine degree in a general four-year program designed to be followed by graduate training in a specialty area. During the first two years of the program, students study the sciences basic to medicine -- anatomy, behavioral science, biochemistry, microbiology, pathology, pharmacology, and physiology.
Clinical correlations to basic material are emphasized, and professional skills are nurtured in a four-semester Introduction to Clinical Practice course continuum.

In the third year medical students leave the classroom and enter the hospitals and clinics full-time for hands-on training with residents under the close supervision of faculty. The final two years of the medical curriculum include required clinical clerkships in family medicine, internal medicine, neurology, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, psychiatry, and surgery. There is also ample opportunity in the fourth year for elective courses, allowing the student flexibility and time to pursue individual interests. While most medical students complete their core clinical training at Columbia-area affiliated hospitals, an optional clinical clerkship program at the Greenville Hospital System is available.

The M.D. program is fully accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education of the American Medical Association and Association of American Medical Colleges. Class size for each of the four years is limited to 72 students. With this relatively small class size, a favorable faculty/student ratio, and varied hospital resources, the University of South Carolina School of Medicine is able to offer the medical student personalized instruction and excellent patient contact opportunities.

As a community-based medical school, the USC School of Medicine provides medical students with preceptorship opportunities in the offices of practicing physicians in the Columbia area. An innovative Rural Primary Care Education Project, in Winnsboro, S.C., provides students with first-hand experience in rural practice. An active faculty research program keeps the medical education program up-to-date and reinforces training in the scientific approach to medicine. As part of South Carolina's flagship state university, the USC School of Medicine also makes available to medical students all the benefits of a large university community, including contact with students and faculty in related disciplines and a variety of university cultural and recreational events.

The University of South Carolina School of Medicine emphasizes research partnerships with affiliated hospitals and agencies to direct investigations to areas of greatest potential benefit to South Carolinians. The Centers of Research Excellence, a joint interdisciplinary venture with Richland Memorial Hospital, includes research centers focused on cancer, cardiovascular disease and stroke, biomedical ethics, and primary health care. The Rural Primary Care Education Project in Winnsboro, S.C., serves as a center for research on rural health care delivery, including telemedicine.

Innovative research on geriatric health care and child and community mental health issues is under way in cooperation with the Byrnes Center for Geriatric Medicine, Education, and Research and the William S. Hall Psychiatric Institute. Other areas of research strength include developmental disabilities, infectious diseases and immunology, and reproductive biology and endocrinology.

Through partnerships with affiliated hospitals and state agencies, the University of South Carolina School of Medicine provides a wide variety of needed and often unique clinical services to South Carolinians. Clinical programs originated or supported by the USC School of Medicine include the Alzheimers Day Care Center, the Center for Developmental Disabilities, the Child Abuse Recovery Center, the Children's Immunology Center, the Clinical Genetics Center, the Geriatric Assessment Clinic, the Martin Primary Health Care Center (Winnsboro), Palmetto Children's Clinic, Palmetto SeniorCare, University Specialty Clinics/University Primary Care, and the Bone Marrow Transplantation Program and Trauma Center of Richland Memorial Hospital.

The School of Medicine Library serves as the School of Medicine's information gateway to over 2,500 biomedical electronic journals, over 300 electronic textbooks (MDConsult, STAT-Ref, Harrison's Online), over 50 key biomedical databases (Medline, Cancerlit, InfoPOEMS, Web of Knowledge), a diagnostic decision support system (DxPLAIN), consumer health information, an online catalog, and DISCUS, South Carolina's state-wide virtual library. The Library's print collection consists of more than 118,000 volumes. The Library provides information resources to meet the needs of the School's faculty, staff, and students and the larger USC community, area health care professionals, and consumers. In its role as a resource library in the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Southeastern/Atlantic Region, the Library also provides biomedical information services to all health care professionals in South Carolina. A complete range of services is available, including reference and instruction, interlibrary loan, and tours and orientations. Professional librarians provide regularly scheduled instructional workshops on PubMed, Ovid, PowerPoint, e-journals, consumer health information on the web, Web of Knowledge, and evidence-based medicine. The library is highly service oriented and offers rapid, individualized information retrieval and delivery. Most resources may be accessed remotely through the library's Web page. School of Medicine students and faculty also have access to all of the print and electronic resources available from the Thomas Cooper Library of the University of South Carolina. Located on the University's main campus, the Thomas Cooper Library provides access to over 26,000 electronic journals, subscribes to more than 18,000 print journals, and has a collection of nearly 3 million bound volumes and 4.5 million microforms.

USCSM is dedicated to the goals of preparing students in the art and science of medicine and providing them with a background for further post-graduate training in a variety of fields of medicine. The curriculum is designed to promote professional growth by developing in students a compassionate response to patients' needs, an understanding of the complexity of patient care, and a perspective on the role of medicine in society.
The four-year curriculum consists of basic science courses and clerkships in applied clinical medicine. All students complete a specific set of courses during the four years. Elective opportunities are available throughout the curriculum to assist students in pursuing individual interests and career goals.

A distinguished core faculty of basic scientists and clinicians brings to USCSM a variety of outstanding academic training and experience. This core faculty is complemented and enriched by a large number of community physicians who participate in both hospital clerkships and office preceptorships. An active faculty research program ensures that the medical education program is kept up-to-date and reinforces training in the scientific approach to medicine. A favorable faculty-student ratio provides both enhanced opportunities for clinical experience and supportive
personal relationships between students and faculty.

USCSM students may participate in a wide variety of organizations: the Medical Student Association, the American Medical Student Association, the Organization of Student Representatives, the American Medical Women's Association, the Medical Student Section of the American Medical Association, the Student National Medical Association, and clubs associated with various medical specialties, including pediatrics, emergency medicine, internal medicine, family practice, surgery, and psychiatry/behavioral science.

USCSM students participate in the extensive intramural athletic and recreational sports programs conducted by the USC Student Affairs Division, with competition in many areas. Students may participate as individuals and with teams in seven intramural sports and in 25 club sports.
A fitness center, equipped with a variety of exercise machines and mats, is located on the USCSM campus. USCSM students also have access to all facilities and programs available to USC students: the Russell House University Union, the Carolina Program Union, Gamecock and Lady Gamecock intercollegiate sports events, all-weather track and tennis courts, the Blatt Physical Fitness Center, and the new Strom Thurmond Physical Fitness Center.


School name:University of South CarolinaSchool of Medicine
Address:6439 Garners Ferry Road
Zip & city:SC 29208 South Carolina
Phone:803-777-7000
Web:http://www.med.sc.edu
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School of Medicine Courses


YEAR 1 COURSES :

* Medical Biochemistry I : Is a four-credit-hour, fall semester, first-year course that covers human biochemistry at the molecular, cellular, and whole-body levels, including information about amino acids, proteins, and enzymes; the general principles of bioenergetics and metabolism; and the biochemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. Clinical correlation conferences on specific diseases and disorders illustrate the clinical relevance of biochemical concepts covered in lecture.
Primary methods of instruction include lectures and clinical correlations. Modes of assessment include departmental multiple choice examinations.

* Medical Biochemistry II : Is a four-credit-hour, spring semester, first-year course that is a continuation of Medical Biochemistry I. The course covers the metabolism of amino acids and nucleic acids; the structure and function of DNA and RNA; protein synthesis and gene regulation; and the biochemistry of selected hormones. Emphasis is placed on unique aspects of the metabolism of specific organs and integration of metabolism within and between organs. Clinical correlation conferences on specific diseases and disorders illustrate the clinical relevance of biochemical concepts covered in lecture.
Primary methods of instruction include lecture and clinical correlations. Modes of assessment include NBME subject examination and a departmental multiple choice/essay examination.

* Medical Microscopic Anatomy : Is a five-credit-hour, fall semester, first-year course in which the structure of cells, tissues, and organs is studied and the functional significance of their morphological features is presented. Students observe, firsthand, histological structures in human tissues through the study of microscopic slides, digitized images, and electron micrographs in the laboratory. Students integrate basic concepts and principles of microscopic structures as they pertain to clinical medicine. Web-based instructional methods and videodisc databases are used to present images and other supporting information relating to overall course content, primarily during laboratory sessions. The goal of laboratory sessions is to facilitate critical thinking skills and correlation of basic science information with clinical problems. The course provides the structural basis for understanding principles to be learned in biochemistry, physiology, and pathology.
Primary methods of instruction include lecture, computer-assisted instruction, problem-solving exercises, clinical correlations, laboratory, independent learning experiences, and small-group discussion.
Modes of assessment include departmental written multiple choice examinations, and laboratory practical examinations.

* Medical Embryology and Gross Anatomy : Is an eight-credit-hour, fall semester, first-year course involving the combined comprehensive study of the gross and developmental anatomy of the human body, taught in a collaborative learning atmosphere, by which the student learns the names, relationships, and basic functions of body structures. The course relies significantly on a commitment to rigorous independent study.
Primary methods of instruction include lecture, case-based discussion/presentation, clinical correlations, laboratory dissections, independent learning experiences, and student-led laboratory teaching sessions.
Modes of assessment include departmental written multiple choice/essay examination, laboratory practical examination, detailed oral examination/presentation, and research paper.

* Medical Physiology : Is an eight-credit hour, spring semester, first-year course that integrates essential concepts and facts about human physiology. This course covers the major areas of physiology, including neuromuscular, respiratory, renal, cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal physiologies; the nervous system; endocrinology; and reproduction. Emphasis is placed on basic physiological processes and homeostatic regulation.
Primary methods of instruction include lecture, computer-assisted instruction, problem-solving exercises, clinical correlations, and small-group discussion. Students gain a deeper understanding of physiological processes by performing laboratory exercises.
Modes of assessment include self-assessment exams, NBME subject examination, departmental multiple choice/essay examination, and laboratory reports.

* Medical Neuroscience : Is a three-credit-hour, spring semester, first-year course that provides a foundation in the functional anatomy of the human nervous system needed to understand the signs and symptoms of neurological injury and to localize it accurately. Students study the human spinal cord, brain stem, and cerebral hemispheres in the laboratory. They also study sensory (auditory, vestibular, visual, olfactory, gustatory, and somesthetic) and motor (pyramidal, extrapyramidal and cerebellar mechanisms, ocular movements, and visual reflexes) systems, as well as the cerebral circulation and ventricular system. Consideration is given to the dorsal thalamus, hypothalamus, and limbic system, with special attention devoted to higher cortical function. Highly interactive, state-of-the-art, computer-assisted instructional programs that include anatomical components, functional organization, and clinical correlations, as well as dynamic three-dimensional reconstructions, magnetic resonance imaging scans, and simulations of neurological disorders, are available for student use.
Primary methods of instruction include lecture, computer-assisted instruction, problem-solving exercises, clinical correlations, and hands-on laboratory sessions that may include clinical correlation with MRI and CT scans.
Modes of assessment include departmental multiple choice/essay examination and laboratory practical examination.

YEAR 2 COURSES :

* Medical Pathology : Is a two-semester, five-credit-hour (fall) and five-credit-hour (spring), second-year course that provides students with an understanding of the basic mechanisms of diseases, the body's response to these diseases, and the manifestation of these changes in patient signs, symptoms, and tests in specific organ systems.
Primary methods of instruction include lecture, case-based discussion/presentation, problem-solving exercises, clinical correlations, laboratory, and small-group discussion.
Modes of assessment include NBME subject examination and departmental multiple choice examination.

* Medical Microbiology : Is a seven-credit-hour, fall semester, second-year course covering fundamental and clinical aspects of microbiology and immunology as they relate to bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. Infectious agents are discussed in relation to their morphology, biology, epidemiology, and pathogenesis. The role of the specific and nonspecific immune systems in defense against infection and disease, as well as in the causation of disease (immunopathogenesis), is emphasized. A section of the course is devoted to special topics in infectious diseases.
Primary methods of instruction include lecture, case-based discussion/presentation, patient-oriented problem-solving exercises, clinical correlations, and laboratory.
Modes of assessment include departmental written multiple choice/essay examination and an assessment of participation in problem-solving exercises, case study discussions, and computer simulated laboratory exercises.

* Medical Pharmacology : Is a seven-credit-hour, spring semester, second-year course covering the major areas of medical pharmacology, including principles of drug action; autonomic, renal, cardiovascular, CNS, and endocrine pharmacologies; chemotherapy; and toxicology. Emphasis is placed on the effects of drugs on pathological and physiological processes, as well as on the biochemical mechanisms by which drugs act.
Primary methods of instruction include lecture, case-based discussion/presentation, problem-solving exercises, clinical correlations, conferences, and small-group discussion.
Modes of assessment include departmental written multiple choice/essay examination.

* Introduction to Clinical Medicine I : Is a two-semester, two-credit-hour (fall) and five-credit-hour (spring), first-year course consisting of an introduction to the medical profession and to doctor-patient and doctor-community relationships, community and preventive medicine concepts, information about the components of health care delivery systems, and basic philosophical principles underlying bioethical decision-making. The stages of normal growth and development are also demonstrated to ensure that students acquire a basis for exploring the life history of the patient with an awareness of issues relevant to different age periods. Information about gender and sexuality is presented, followed by a discussion of sexual disorders and dysfunctions. Students are introduced to the basic skills of medical interviewing and the mental status examination. In addition, beginning in the spring semester, each student will be assigned a senior mentor with whom they will practice the medical interviewing skills as well as discuss normal aging.
Primary methods of instruction include lecture, problem-based learning, standardized/simulated patients, and small-group discussion.
Modes of assessment include written multiple choice/essay examination, and assessment of performance in the medical interview and the mental status examination and of participation in small-group discussion and problem-based learning.

* Introduction to Clinical Medicine II : Is a two-semester, eight-credit-hour (fall) and eight-credit-hour (spring), second-year course consisting of an introduction to the fundamentals of physical examination and physical diagnosis and the use of various models to assist in the conceptualization of psychopathological behavior, with an emphasis on the relationship of emotional factors to physical illness. Developmental problems of children, adolescents and adults, addictive problems, sleep disorders, and organic mental disorders are discussed. The course emphasizes the use of population-based data in making sound judgments regarding the clinical care of individual patients and interventions at the community level. Bioethical issues in the care of patients and techniques of prevention are presented and discussed, as are the most frequently encountered primary care clinical problems. The course includes information about frequently used radiologic and clinical laboratory studies and their value and limitations in the context of the pathophysiology of various disease states. The course utilizes an organ system approach and integrates with the medical pathology course, physical diagnosis, and radiology. A portion of the spring semester is devoted to a series of problem-based learning exercises designed to integrate information from the Introduction to Clinical Medicine course continuum with knowledge gained from first and second-year basic science courses and to prepare students for the transition to the clinical environment in the third and fourth years.
Primary methods of instruction include lecture, problem-based learning, self-instruction modules, standardized/simulated patients, and small-group discussion.
Modes of assessment include written multiple choice/essay examination, assessment of participation in small-group discussion and problem-based learning, Objective Structured Clinical Evaluations, a Community Medicine Project poster preparation and presentation, and the NBME Introduction to Clinical Diagnosis subject exam.

YEAR 3 COURSES :

* Family Medicine Clerkship : Is an eight-week, eight-credit-hour required clerkship in the third year. Students care for ambulatory patients under the supervision of faculty members and residents for two weeks in the Family Practice Center of Palmetto Health Richland or the Center for Family Medicine of Greenville Memorial Hospital. They also participate for two weeks as integral members of a team that provides care to hospitalized patients on the family practice inpatient service. In these settings, students perform initial work-ups on new patients and care for patients with established problems; they also have the opportunity for collaboration with nurses, nurse practitioners, and other health professionals. In addition, all students spend four weeks in the office of a practicing physician where they experience health care delivery as it is provided in a community family practice. For students who express an interest in primary care practice in the rural setting, community primary care experiences are available through the Deans' Rural Primary Care Clerkship in Winnsboro and Kershaw, SC. At these sites, students work closely with students in other health profession programs (nursing, social work, pharmacy, and public health) and employ a multi-disciplinary approach to health care for patients, their families, and the community.
Primary methods of instruction include lecture, case-based discussion/presentation, computer-assisted instruction, clinical preceptorship, problem-solving exercises, community project, conferences, standardized/simulated patients, small-group discussion, and teaching rounds.
Modes of assessment include NBME subject examination, clinical evaluation, oral examination/presentation, and Objective Structured Clinical Evaluation (OSCE).
Demonstration of mastery of the following minimum clinical skills is required for successful completion of this clerkship: performance of an outpatient-oriented, problem-focused history and directed physical examination; performance of a comprehensive inpatient history and physical examination; participation in a well-child visit and a discussion of pediatric developmental milestones; participation in the assessment of a nursing home patient; and performance of a gynecologic screening examination (Pap smear and breast examination).
Demonstration of mastery of the following clinical skills is strongly recommended during this clerkship: participation in the nutritional assessment of a patient; participation in a family-centered prenatal visit; observation and performance of outpatient dermatologic procedures; observation of a colposcopy and endometrial biopsy; observation of exercise stress testing; observation of a nasopharyngoscopy; observation of a flexible sigmoidoscopy; and observation of an individual or family psychotherapy session.

* Internal Medicine Clerkship : Is an eight-week, eight-credit-hour required clerkship in the third year consisting of a six-week inpatient block and a two-week ambulatory block. During the inpatient block, students perform as active members of the student/housestaff/attending physician team. Students are assigned patients, obtain medical histories, perform physical examinations, evaluate laboratory data, and analyze the information in order to define patients' problems. Performance is reviewed both during specific preceptor-student contacts and during student presentations on actual ward rounds with the team. During the outpatient block, students work closely with preceptors, discussing each patient encounter in depth and participating in case conferences and other didactic sessions. Students become familiar with concepts of time management and performance of focused patient assessments. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of clinical findings in terms of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of disease and the subsequent translation of this information into rational decisions about management. The clerkship provides students, through active participation, with opportunities to observe the diagnostic process as it unfolds and to develop competence in evaluating broad clinical problems.

* Clinical Psychiatry Clerkship : Is an eight-week, eight-credit-hour required clerkship in the third year in which the evaluation and treatment of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly as applicable to general medical practice, are reviewed in detail. Skills and knowledge in psychopharmacology, differential diagnosis, treatment planning, and the doctor/patient relationship are developed. A variety of clinical rotation sites is available. Required clerkship components include attendance at an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting and at a probate court hearing, and a videotaped interview.
Primary methods of instruction include lecture, case-based discussion/presentation, clinical preceptorship, conferences, small-group discussion, and teaching rounds.

* Obstetrics/Gynecology Clerkship : Is an eight-week, eight-credit-hour required clerkship in the third year that introduces students to the care of female patients through a variety of inpatient and outpatient experiences. Four weeks of the clerkship is devoted to obstetrics and four weeks is devoted to gynecology. Students are exposed to the specialized divisions of obstetrics and gynecology (e.g., maternal-fetal medicine). Students participate in a limited rotating call schedule to experience first-hand unique aspects of the practice of obstetrics and gynecology. The clerkship provides students with both a broad-based education useful to physicians in general, as well as detailed knowledge about practice in obstetrics and gynecology.
Primary methods of instruction include lecture, case-based discussion/presentation, conferences, and teaching rounds.

* Pediatric Clerkship : Is an eight-week, eight-credit-hour required clerkship in the third year designed to provide a broad overview of general pediatrics. The clerkship consists of four weeks on a general pediatrics ward, including pediatric intensive care unit, and hematology/oncology service; two weeks in the outpatient pediatric clinic; one week in the newborn nursery and developmental pediatrics; and one week in subspecialty and community pediatrics. In the outpatient setting, students gain experience in the evaluation of patients with common pediatric disorders (e.g., pneumonia, behavioral problems, and gastroenteritis) and in the ambulatory management of complex pediatric disorders, as well as exposure to patients in the child abuse clinic. The inpatient setting provides experience in the full range of pediatric problems from routine pneumonia, croup, and dehydration to the rare and complex entities of congenital disorders and inborn errors of metabolism. In the newborn nursery, students develop skills in the basic newborn examination. During the developmental pediatrics rotation, students make home visits to families of children with special needs.
Primary methods of instruction include lecture, problem-based learning, case-based discussion/presentation, clinical preceptorship, problem-solving exercises, home visit, independent learning experiences, conferences, small-group discussion, and teaching rounds.

* Surgery Clerkship : Is an eight-week, eight-credit-hour required clerkship in the third year consisting of inpatient and outpatient experiences, under the supervision of attending staff physicians and residents, in general surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, pediatric surgery, vascular surgery, anesthesiology, trauma, and critical care. Students continue to develop skills in medical history-taking, physical examination, and the use of laboratory data in an organized fashion to understand surgical diseases. During this clerkship, students understand the metabolic and physiologic effects of injury and trauma; correlate disordered physiology with the surgical pathologic process; recognize surgical illness and the place of operative intervention in treatment of diseases; understand the impact of surgery on the patient and family, including the psychological and socioeconomic changes that result from an operation; and acquire surgical techniques and skills basic to all physicians, including wound care, suture technique, and the ability to assist in the operating room.
Primary methods of instruction include lecture, case-based discussion/presentation, suture laboratory, conferences, small-group discussion, and teaching rounds.

YEAR 4 COURSES :

* Internal Medicine Clerkship : Is an eight-week, four-credit-hour required clerkship in the fourth year consisting of a general internal medicine rotation and one to two subspecialty rotations. Students may do an "acting internship," participate in outpatient clinics, and do inpatient and outpatient subspecialty consultations and routine follow-up care.
Instruction methods include lectures, case-based discussion, student presentations, clinical preceptorship, grand rounds, noon conferences, seminars, and small group discussion.
Assessment involves clinical evaluation, a written case report, student presentations, and conference and seminar participation.

* Clinical Neurology Clerkship : Is a four-week, four-credit-hour required clerkship in the fourth year during which students are assigned to one of the clinical teaching services and are assigned new patients and selected follow-up patients by the teaching staff in the inpatient and ambulatory care settings. Emphasis is placed on students' acquisition of skills in the use of the medical history and physical and neurological examinations to localize accurately disorders of the nervous system and to plan comprehensive diagnostic and therapeutic programs for patients.
Primary methods of instruction include lecture, clinical preceptorship, conferences, small-group discussion, and teaching rounds.

* Clinical Ophthalmology : This four-week, four-credit-hour elective rotation in the fourth year complements the previous ophthalmology course program presented in the physical diagnosis component of the second-year Introduction to Clinical Medicine course. This rotation presents in-depth information about basic ophthalmic subjects (anatomy and physiology) and common ocular diseases (e.g., cataracts, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy). Emphasis is placed on ocular manifestations of systemic diseases, the relation of drugs and the eye, and on detailed instruction on the basic eye exam. Students are introduced to and learn about more sophisticated examining equipment—the slit lamp biomicroscope and tonometer. Students see a large number of patients with a variety of ocular conditions and observe ophthalmic microsurgery. Students attend clinical grand rounds weekly and any resident lectures that may be appropriate. This rotation is of particular interest to students who plan to train in any of the primary care specialties or other specialties (e.g., neurology and neurosurgery) where additional ophthalmology knowledge is essential. Students are assigned to a faculty member and work also with all the departmental residents. At the conclusion of the rotation, each student produces a two-page typewritten report on a subject of his or her choice from a selection of more than 20 clinical topics provided at the beginning of the rotation.

* Surgery : Is a four-week, four-credit hour required clerkship in the fourth year consisting of exposure to surgical specialties and academic and clinical experiences in orthopaedic surgery, urology, ophthalmology, plastic surgery, cardiovascular surgery, otolaryngology, neurosurgery, and anesthesia. Both office and hospital-based experiences permit the study of disease processes unique to each of the special areas of surgery, the techniques of diagnosis, the understanding of pathophysiology, and therapy. Management of ambulatory patients is emphasized. During this clerkship, students diagnose the diseases particular to the selected surgical specialty and develop the techniques utilized for diagnosis; understand the pathophysiology and management of these disease processes; recognize indicated surgical therapy and expected results from the surgical procedures for these diseases; understand and decide when the patient should be evaluated by a surgical specialty related to the disease process; and understand the impact of surgical care on the patient and the family. Students complete a written report on a topic of interest.
Primary methods of instruction include clinical preceptorship, clinical correlations, and teaching rounds.

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Medical University of South Carolina (College of Medicine)
YEAR 1 COURSES : * Anatomical Basis of Medicine : Provides the student with a good understanding of the structure and function of the human body an...
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