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University of Kansas (School of Medicine)




The University of Kansas School of Medicine began as a two-year medical preparatory program in 1880 on the University of Kansas campus in Lawrence, Kansas. In 1889, Simeon Bell, MD, donated land and money to the state of Kansas for a medical school in Rosedale, a suburb just south of Kansas City, Kansas. Dr. Bell's intent was to build a teaching hospital so that the University of Kansas could provide medical education for future physicians. The school and Bell Memorial Hospital, named after his wife Eleanor, moved to its present location in Kansas City, Kansas in 1924.

The hospital, now a quasi public authority known as The University of Kansas Hospital, is part of a large campus known as the University of Kansas Medical Center (KUMC) that is comprised of the School of Medicine, School of Allied Health, School of Nursing, Graduate Studies, Kansas University Research Institute, and several other research and clinical centers.

KU graduated 57 students from the medical school's first class in 1906. Today, the school annually enrolls 175 students in its four-year MD program. Students spend their first two years, the pre-clinical phase, in Kansas City. The remaining two years, the clinical phase, are completed at either the KUMC campus in Kansas City or at the school's branch clinical campus in Wichita. After graduation, students enter into residency training programs all over the country.

Other degrees offered by the school include a Masters in Public Health, a Masters in Health Policy Management, and a MD/PhD degree. These outstanding basic science programs offer graduate degrees in the following disciplines: microbiology, molecular genetics and immunology, anatomy and cell biology, biochemistry and molecular biology, pharmacology, toxicology, and therapeutics, pathology laboratory medicine, molecular and integrative physiology.

The faculty and staff of the KU School of Medicine in Kansas City and Wichita are dedicated to preparing their students for the future of medicine by providing innovative education and training needed to practice in today's ever-changing health care delivery system.

The University of Kansas School of Medicine commits to enhance the quality of life and serve our community through the discovery of knowledge, the education of health professionals and by improving the health of the public.

The University of Kansas School of Medicine will work with its partners to become the premier academic medical center in the region known for its excellent education, innovative scientific discovery, outstanding clinical programs and dedication to community service. It will be known as the place where everyone wants to come to learn, to teach, to conduct research and to receive his or her health care.

The Medical Center’s facilities are continually updated and expanded to keep abreast of the most modern teaching and treatment techniques. The $5.5-million basic sciences facility, Orr-Major Hall, was dedicated in 1976. This building includes classrooms, laboratories, an auditorium, and a learning resources center.

Completed in 1979, the $61.5-million University of Kansas Hospital, brings nearly all the diagnostic and treatment facilities of the Medical Center under one roof. The building eases and speeds coordination between departments and enables the staff and employees to give patients the best possible care. The hospital offers complete primary and tertiary care for patients of all ages from obstetrical and newborn to geriatric care, and care for a range of problems from traumatic injuries to long-term and chronic conditions.

The Archie R. Dykes Library for Health Sciences, which opened in 1983, contains more than 170,000 books, 1,300 print journals, 5,000 other informational materials, and 3,000 electronic journal titles in the biomedical and related health sciences. The library serves the educational and research needs of Medical Center students and faculty and the public. Membership in a national interlibrary loan program ensures that students and faculty at all Kansas state colleges and universities and health professionals in Kansas have access to this collection, as well as to the collections of other libraries across the nation. Computer searches of more than 100 health-related data bases are available to students, faculty, and Kansas health professionals. A major renovation project began in October 2003. In fall 2005, there will be two new classrooms, several new closed study rooms, a 90-seat testing center, wireless connectivity, and 24-hour availability to KUMC students.

The renowned Clendening History of Medicine Library has one of the top five collections of rare medical books in the country. The library contains more than 25,000 first or early editions of almost all important works in medical literature.

The Department of Student Services coordinates services for Medical Center students, including records and registration, financial aid, counseling, student life/wellness, housing, and student health. The Student Center Building at the corner of Olathe and Rainbow Boulevards houses the department and a student lounge. On the first floor, computers are available for students to access e-mail, the Internet, and Microsoft software, along with a networked printer. Study areas and lockers are also available.

Next to the student center is the Division of Health Care Outreach and Continuing Education. KU has offered postgraduate study in medicine almost continuously since 1911. Currently, the Division of Health Care Outreach and Continuing Education offers seminars, clinical traineeships, and programs for doctors and other health professionals.

Kirmayer Fitness Center is a two-story, 46,000-square-foot facility at the southeast corner of Rainbow and Olathe Boulevards. It promotes physical fitness and wellness among members of the KU Medical Center. All students automatically become members with payment of a fee of $45 per semester or $18 per summer session. Fitness and recreation programs include land aerobics, water aerobics, tai-chi, yoga, karate, weight watchers at work, and intramural leagues in volleyball, basketball, softball, and racquetball/ squash, among others. Information is available from (913) 588-1KFC (1532) during business hours, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. Regular hours are Monday through Thursday, 5:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday, 5:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Sunday, 12 to 9 p.m. Special holiday and other hours may be announced. The Kirmayer Fitness Center is for faculty, staff, students, and alumni of KU Medical Center and their spouses.

A day-long clinical skills examination is conducted for all senior medical students. Standardized patient cases represent all required third year clerkships and a diverse patient population. Skills assessed include history taking, physical examination, interpersonal communication, and case management. Standardized patients are trained to observe and record student behavior, while videotaping provides a permanent record of each encounter.

The University of Kansas School of Medicine provides an innovative curriculum that combines intensive instruction in the basic sciences with hands-on patient-based clinical training. Students have opportunities to use a variety of teaching tools, including small-group discussions, case-based learning, electronic procedure simulators, labs and actors portraying patients, to perfect their skills. On-campus board examination preparation programs also are provided. The more than 500 full-time faculty instructors are among the best clinicians and scientists in the their fields.

To help students achieve competency in patient skills, medical procedures, and interpersonal communication with patients and colleagues, the KU School of Medicine has developed a Clinical Skills Laboratory. This state of the art skills lab is used to help students develop proficiency in essential clinical skills. Medical students work with computer programs, manikins, standardized patients, and emerging virtual reality simulations to learn, broaden, and assess their competence with basic and
advanced clinical procedures.


School name:University of KansasSchool of Medicine
Address:3901 Rainbow Boulevard
Zip & city:KS 66160 Kansas
Phone:913-588-5200
Web:http://www.kumc.edu/som
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School of Medicine Courses


FIRST YEAR COURSES :

* Human Anatomy and Embryology I : Study of the macroscopic structures of the human body.

* Human Anatomy and Embryology II : Study of the macroscopic structures of the human body.

* Cell and Tissue Biology I : A course, consisting of lectures and laboratories, devoted to the study of microscopic anatomy at the organ, tissue, cell and subcellular levels; lectures emphasize modern cell biological concepts and the correlation of structure with cell, tissue, and organ function; laboratories teach the identification of cells, tissues and organs and relate this information to functional concepts presented in lecture.

* Cell & Tissue Biology II (3) : A course, consisting of lectures and laboratories, devoted to the study of microscopic anatomy at the organ, tissue, cell and subcellular levels; lectures emphasize modern cell biological concepts and the correlation of structure with cell, tissue, and organ function; laboratories teach the identification of cells, tissues and organs and relate this information to functional concepts presented in lecture. Prerequisite: Student in good standing in freshman class. LEC

* Medical Biochemistry I : Includes a review of the structure, chemistry and metabolism of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids, as well as sections on enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics, integrated metabolism, the biochemical basis of nutrition and molecular genetics. The molecular basis of disease is emphasized throughout the course. In addition to lectures, a series of small group discussions and clinical correlations relating biochemical principles and concepts to medical problems are led by biochemistry faculty and selected clinical faculty. Not applicable to a degree from the graduate school. LEC

* Medical Biochemistry II : Includes a review of the structure, chemistry and metabolism of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids, as well as sections on enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics, integrated metabolism, the biochemical basis of nutrition and molecular genetics. The molecular basis of disease is emphasized throughout the course. In addition to lectures, a series of small group discussions and clinical correlations relating biochemical principles and concepts to medical problems are led by biochemistry faculty and selected clinical faculty. Not applicable to a degree from the graduate school. Prerequisite: Student in good standing in freshman class. LEC

* Introduction to Clinical Medicine I : This course consists of two modules: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP), and Clinical Skills I. HPDP presents and introduction to healthy growth and development across the lifespan. Through lectures, students examine the physician's role in promoting health in all its dimensions: physical, psychological, intellectual, emotional, spiritual, social, and behavioral. Clinical Skills I helps students acquire and use the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of a competent caring clinician. Through lectures demonstrations, tutorials, standardized patient encounters, and preceptor experiences, students learn and practice patient interviewing and physical examination. This module emphasizes the evaluation of the normal patient and the application of principles introduced in basic science courses (e.g., anatomy and physiology) to the physical exam. Students are evaluated through written examinations and other written assignments, small group presentations, preceptor activities, and standardized patient encounters.

* Neuroscience : A course combining and integrating several disciplines, including neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neurochemistry, introducing neuropharmacology and basic neurology; the teaching utilizes lectures, conferences, laboratories and demonstrations.

* Medical Physiology I : A course covering the mechanisms involved in the function of organ systems and their control by neural, humoral, and endocrine pathways. Lectures are combined with small group conferences, problem solving, and laboratory sessions. Prerequisite: Student in good standing in freshman class. LEC

* Medical Physiology II : A course covering the mechanisms involved in the function of organ systems and their control by neural, humoral and endocrine pathways. In addition, a unit on human nutrition is included. Lectures are combined with small groups conferences, problem-solving, and laboratory sessions. Prerequisite: Student in good standing in freshman class.

SECOND YEAR COURSES :

* Introduction to Clinical Medicine II : This course consists of two modules: Clinical Epidemiology and Prevention (CEP) and Clinical Skills II. CEP provides an introduction to biostatics and epidemiology, and illustrates their relevance to clinical practice, research, and public health policy. Students also examine the role of clinical preventive services, including counseling, immunization, and screening. Clinical Skills II builds on material covered in the clinical skills component of ICM 801/802. The focus of this module is the evaluation of patients with common complaints and illnesses. Through lectures, demonstrations, tutorials, standardized patient encounters, and preceptor experiences, students develop skills in interviewing, physical examination, and the use and interpretation of laboratory tests. Case-based tutorials introduce students to the principles of differential diagnosis and evidence-based medicine. Students are evaluated through written examinations and other written assignments, small group presentations, preceptor activities, and standardized patient encounters.

* Introduction to Clinical Medicine II : This course consists of three modules: the Patient-Doctor Relationship in the 21st Century (Medical Ethics), Behavioral Medicine, and Clinical Skills II. The Patient-Doctor Relationship in the 21st Century introduces students to the disciplines of medical ethics, law and medicine, and literature and medicine. Through lectures and small group discussions, students explore the ethical and legal aspects of the physician-patient relationship. Course activities also promote the development of biological and psychosocial basis of psychopathology and the assessment and management of disturbances of perception, cognition, mood, and behavior. Readings and lectures describe biopsychosocial risk factors associated with major psychiatric syndromes: cognitive disorders, personality disorders, sexual dysfunction, depression, anxiety, sleep disturbances, and substances use disorders. Demonstrations (videotape and live patient presentations) highlight diagnostic methods and clinical management techniques. Clinical Skills II builds on material covered in the clinical skills component of ICM 801/802. The focus of this module is the evaluation of patients with common complaints and illnesses. Through lectures, demonstrations, tutorials, standardized patient encounters, and preceptor experiences, students develop skills in interviewing, physical examination, and the use and interpretation of laboratory tests. Case-based tutorials introduce students to the principles of differential diagnosis and evidence-based medicine. Students are evaluated through written examinations and other written assignments, small group presentations, preceptor activities, and standardized patient encounters.

* Microbiology : The course presents microbial physiology and microbial genetics with emphasis on the molecular biology of microorganisms; Immunology with emphasis on the defense mechanism, immune regulation and immunogenetics and selected coverage of etiologic agents of infection in bacteriology, parasitology, mycology, and virology. Lectures, small group conferences and tutorials.

* Pathology I–General Pathology : The basic mechanisms of human disease, including cellular pathology, inflammation, diseases of immunity, neoplasia, infectious diseases and aging are considered through the mechanisms of lectures, small-group problem based care study and autopsy demonstrations.

* Systemic Pathology : Human disease is studied by organ system blocks to include cardiovascular, hematologic, renal, respiratory, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, musculoskeletal, endocrine and nervous system diseases. The pathobiology of all major diseases occurring within each organ system are considered by lectures, small-groups case study preceptorials and autopsy participation. Teaching in Pathology 851 will be coordinated with Physical Diagnosis teaching to achieve optimum concentration on individual disease categories.

* Pharmacology : Pharmacology covers the following topics: establishment of rational pharmacological basis for drug therapy; physiological and biochemical effects of drugs and foreign compounds on biological systems; mechanisms responsible for therapeutic and toxic effects, uses, and disadvantages of drugs.

THIRD YEAR COURSES :

Student clerkship experiences take place in the hospital and clinic settings. Clerkships may take place in the University of Kansas Hospital and clinics or in affiliated hospitals and clinics, depending on departmental arrangements. Clerkships include rotation on the teaching services, teaching rounds, departmental case conferences, and weekly Grand Rounds.

* Ambulatory Medicine/Geriatrics : This clerkship is designed to prepare students for delivery of medical care in the ambulatory and long term care settings with an emphasis on geriatrics. It is jointly sponsored by the Department of Internal Medicine and Family Medicine in collaboration with the Center on Aging. Students participate as a member of the healthcare team in the outpatient offices of primary and specialty care physicians providing care to adult patients. To introduce students to multi-disciplinary approaches to care, they visit a variety of community-based long term care settings such as assisted living and nursing facilities, hospice, and home care. These clinical experiences are augmented by web-based modules on geriatric topics, seminars on common and important medical topics, and workshops on preventive medicine and diagnostic testing. The clinical portion of the clerkship is in sequence with the Family Medicine Clerkship (FAPR 950); the didactic portions are coordinated to enhance student learning on both clerkships. Evaluation is based on assessment of clinical performance, an objective structured clinical exam, evidence-based medicine assignments, seminar participation, and a departmental written exam.

* Clerkship in Family Medicine : The goal of the Family Medicine Clerkship is to ground the student in the basic tenets and principles of Family Practice and its role in community based health care. The clerkship will initiate, foster, and develop the knowledge base, skills, and attitudes essential to a medical specialty that integrates biological, clinical, and behavioral perspectives in its provision of continuous and comprehensive health care for the individual, family, and community. The student will have the unique opportunity to learn these principles in a one-on-one relationships with an established community Family Practitioner.

* Basic Gynecology-Obstetrics Clerkship : During this clerkship the student develops understanding of disease in women through history, physical examination, and laboratory studies. The clerkship includes study of biochemical, anatomical, and physiological changes of normal pregnancy and the effect of disease in altering the course of reproduction.

* Issues in Clinical Medicine : This course enables students to apply the theoretical framework developed in ICM 801/802 and 850/851 to the patient care activities in which they participate during third-year clerkships. Through lectures and small group discussions students examine the ethical, legal and social aspects of medical practice and application of key principles to clinical practice. Students also explore career opportunities in medicine and factors to be considered in choosing a medical specialty. Students are evaluated through written assignments and participation in course activities.

* Basic Medical Clerkship : General medicine orientation. Students will be assigned to Kansas University Medical Center, Providence St. Margaret, and Kansas City Veterans Administration Hospitals. Offered I and XII.

* General Pediatrics : The student's activities will include rotations on the pediatric inpatient wards (taking histories, examining children, and making daily ward rounds with staff physicians) and the outpatient clinics and newborn nursery. Student evaluations are based primarily upon clinical performance, assessment of problem-solving skills and performance on a written multiple-choice examination given at the end of the clerkship. Offered in modules I and II, III and IV, V and VI, VII and VIII, IX and X, XI and XII.


* Neuropsychiatry :. The required eight-week Neuropsychiatry clerkship is intended to familiarize students with the diagnosis and treatment of major psychiatric and neurological disorders. Effective interviewing and diagnostic skills, and competent performance of the mental status and neurological examinations are emphasized. Students have an active, closely supervised role in the diagnosis and treatment of both hospitalized and ambulatory patients. Clinical experience is accompanied by a didactice schedule of lectures, seminars, and practical-interactive learning sessions.

* Junior Surgery Clerkship : Surgical problems and diseases are studied utilizing lectures, skills laboratory experiences, study questions, clinical problem discussion and live patients. This course prepares the student to meet the pertinent aspects of the summative competencies of the University of Kansas School of Medicine during the third year of Medical School. A particularly useful goal of this course is to teach the student to identify life-threatening conditions that require urgent intervention. Although the skills of this course are necessary for an ambulatory practice, the skills that are taught in this course are most frequently seen and performed in the hospital setting. The student is expected to have a basic understanding of normal and abnormal body function. The student is expected to have completed successfully the basic course in physical diagnosis (years 1 and 2 of medical school).

FOURTH YEAR

The fourth-year curriculum allows students to design a personalized course of study. The selectives enable students to make choices about their courses, but these choices must include a selection in the following specific areas of study: rural medicine, critical care, health of the public, and a subinternship.

COURSES :

* Rural Medicine : A preceptorship of four weeks with a rural practicing physician in the state of Kansas is required for graduation. The student can select from the clinical disciplines of family medicine, internal medicine, or pediatrics.

* Preceptorship : A preceptorship of four weeks with a practicing physician in the state of Kansas is required for graduation. The emphasis of the preceptorship is on Family Practice and other primary care specialties (general internal medicine and general pediatrics). All assignments are made by the program coordinator: private arrangements with individual physicians will not be honored. Students will be reimbursed for one trip to and from the preceptorship site and the preceptor will provide room, board and laundry. A few preceptors will allow the students to bring his/her spouse and inquiries regarding this should be brought to the Preceptorship office. The preceptor will expect the student to participate in all phases in his/her professional life, including house calls, night calls, civic, administrative and social activities. The degree of student responsibility will be determined by the preceptor, who will evaluate the student performance as a preceptee. The student is required to prepare a written evaluation. Offered in Modules I-XII.

* Critical Care : The four-week critical care selective presents the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to care for very ill hospitalized patients. Individual courses are available in emergency departments and intensive care facilities (pediatrics, neonatal, medical, surgical, coronary, etc.). This allows the student to focus on an interest in a particular specialty and ensures that all students have basic knowledge and skills in critical care.

* Critical Care: Post-Anesthesia Unit :The objective of this clerkship is to provide students with experience in the management of critically ill patients. Students will participate in the diagnosis and treatment of patients in the KUMC Post-Anesthesia Unit. Clinical work will be supplemented by conferences and other educational activities. This clerkship fulfills the Critical Care Selective requirement.

* Critical Care: Coronary Care Unit :The objective of this clerkship is to provide students with experience in the management of critically ill patients with cardiovascular disorders. Students will participate in the diagnosis and treatment of patients in the KUMC or Kansas City VAMC Coronary Care Unit. Clinical work will be supplemented by conferences, formal and informal lectures and other educational activities. This clerkship fulfills the Critical Care Selective requirement.

* Critical Care: Medical Intensive Care Unit :The objective of this clerkship is to provide students with experience in the management of critically ill patients. Students will participate in the diagnosis and treatment of patients in the KUMC or Kansas City VAMC Medical Intensive Care Unit. Clinical work will be supplemented by conferences and other educational activities. This clerkship fulfills the Critical Care Selective requirement.

* Critical Care: Neonatology : The student will be actively involved in the care and management of the high-risk and acutely ill neonate. Through a clinical participation, tutorial sessions and assigned reading emphasis will be placed on modern neonatal intensive care techniques and developmental physiology and biochemistry. Students may elect additional consecutive four-week periods to pursue aspects of neonatology in more detail, engage in investigative projects or acquire first-hand experience in the operation of a regionalized program for care of high-risk or acutely ill neonates in the state. Students wishing this additional four weeks should contact the Pediatric Department.

* Critical Care: Pediatric Intensive Careunit : Principles of ongoing assessment and management of critically ill children with single and multiple organ failure will be presented. The teaching format will be formal and informal rounds at the bedside in the KUMC Pediatric ICU by faculty members of the Pediatric Critical Care Division. Integration of history-taking, physical examination skills, and laboratory and radiological assessment with pathophysiology will be emphasized.

* Critical Care: Emergency Room : The objective of this clerkship is to provide students with experience in the management of critically ill patients. Students will participate in the diagnosis and treatment of patients in the KUMC Emergency Room. Clinical work will be supplemented by conferences and other educational activities. This clerkship fulfills the Critical Care Selective requirement.

* Critical Care: Burn Center : The objective of this clerkship is to provide students with experience in the management of critically ill patients. Students will participate in the diagnosis and treatment of patients in the KUMC Burn Center. Clinical work will be supplemented by conferences and other educational activities. This clerkship fulfills the Critical Care Selective requirement.

* Critical Care: Neurosurgical Intensive Care Unit : The objective of this clerkship is to provide students with experience in the management of critically ill patients. Students will participate in the diagnosis and treatment of patients in the KUMC Neurosurgical Intensive Care Unit. Clinical work will be supplemented by conferences and other educational activities. This clerkship fulfills the Critical Care Selective requirement.

* Critical Care: Surgical Intensive Care Unit : The objective of this clerkship is to provide students with experience in the management of critically ill patients. Students will participate in the diagnosis and treatment of patients in the KUMC Surgical Intensive Care Unit. Clinical work will be supplemented by conferences and other educational activities. This clerkship fulfills the Critical Care Selective requirement.

* Health of the Public : This required four-week course offers senior medical students the opportunity to work at a clinic or agency on a service-based project in community-oriented primary care. Students may select a project on population-based health care, health care finance, quality of and access to medical care, or occupational and environmental medicine. Lectures and workshops augment the on-site activity.
This required clerkship is designed to instruct fourth-year medical students about population-based approaches to health care and to facilitate the application of epidemiologic principles to clinical decision making. Using some of the basic concepts described under the auspices of community oriented primary care, students will learn how to define specific populations, ascertain their health care needs, formulate interventions to meet those needs and evaluate the impact of those interventions. Learning opportunities will develop and reinforce concepts related to health services organization and delivery, community dimensions of medical practice, occupational and environmental medicine, health care finances, access to medical care, and quality of medical care. This clerkship will include didactic teachings supplemented by course reading material and workshops that involve care studies and site visits. Learning experiences will allow the student to examine what it means for a physician to be part of a community and to explore the role that the community plays in the health of an individual. Practical application of course material will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Completion of third-year medical school curriculum.

* Subinternship : The required four-week subinternship gives medical students an opportunity to become more proficient in a specific area of medicine. Subinternships can be taken in any of the six core specialties (obstetrics/ gynecology, pediatrics, surgery, family medicine, internal medicine, or psychiatry). They provide a more comprehensive course than that of the third-year required clerkship.

* Subinternship in Family Medicine : This clerkship is designed to prepare students for the responsibilities encountered as a first-year resident. Students will be required to perform the following: 1) actively participate in the management of a panel of inpatients on the Family Medicine Service, 2) participate in the care of outpatients in the Family Medicine Clinic, 3) take one in-house call weekly, and 4) take one OB call weekly. In fulfilling these responsibilities, some weekend participation will be necessary. Students will be expected to complete the same objectives listed in FAPR 950, but do so in an advanced manner incorporating a well-developed and organized approach to multifaceted clinical issues accompanied with a keen perception of non-clinical factors involved in Family Practice. A resident level examination will be administered covering both inpatient and outpatient topics.

* Subinternship in Obstetrics and Gynecology : The objective of this clerkship is to provide students with advanced experience in obstetrics and gynecology. Students will be assigned to the Obstetrics and Gynecology Service at KUMC. Students will participate in the management of common obstetrical and gynecologic conditions in a role similar to that of a resident. Clinical work will be supplemented by conferences and other educational activities. This clerkship fulfills the Subinternship Selective requirement.

* Subinternship in Internal Medicine : The objective of this clerkship is to provide students with advanced experience in the management of acutely ill medical patients. Students will be assigned to one of five locations: KUMC; the Kansas City VAMC; the Leavenworth VAMC; or St. Catherine's Hospital, Garden City. Students will participate in the diagnosis and treatment of common medical conditions in a role similar to that of a resident. Clinical work will be supplemented by conferences and other educational activities. This clerkship fulfills the Subinternship Selective requirement.

* Philmont Adolescent Medicine : The Philmont Adolescent Medicine experience is in the high altitude environment at Philmont Scout Ranch in New Mexico. Students learn health screening, care of sports injuries, and diagnosis and management of pediatric, medical, surgical, gynecologic problems, primarily of teenagers, but also of children and adults. Supervision of students consists of faculty members from medicine, pediatrics, surgery, neurology, family practice, gynecology, and physical medicine in an effort to give well-rounded educational guidance to the students. National Boards, Part I, must be passed in order to receive clinical elective credit. Limited to one four week experience to count toward required clinical electives. Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Physical Diagnosis, Pathology and Pharmacology.

* Subinternship in Otolaryngology : The objective of this clerkship is to provide students with advanced experience in otolaryngology. Students will be assigned to the Otolaryngology Service at KUMC. Students will participate in the management of common ENT conditions in a role similar to that of a resident. Clinical work will be supplemented by conferences and other educational activities. This clerkship fulfills the Subinternship Selective requirement.

* Subinternship in Pediatrics : This selective is an extension of the basic pediatric clerkship. It is designed to permit senior medical students to take increasing responsibility of patient care under close supervision of the faculty. Students will learn skills in patient management by active participation in the daily activities of the pediatric residency program. This selective is entirely clinical. The student will work on the Pediatric Inpatient Unit at KUMC. Student performance will be evaluated by the faculty based on factual knowledge, practical skills, problem-solving abilities, and personal behavior and values. On the first day of the rotation, students will report to the senior pediatric resident assigned to the pediatric floor. Prerequisite: PED 900 or equivalent.

* Philmont Adolescent Medicine : The Philmont Adolescent Medicine experience is in the high altitude environment at Philmont Scout Ranch in New Mexico. Students learn health screening, care of sports injuries, and diagnosis and management of pediatric, medical, surgical, gynecologic problems, primarily of teenagers, but also of children and adults. Supervision of students consists of faculty members from Medicine Pediatrics, Surgery, Neurology, Family Practice, Gynecology, and Physical Medicine in an effort to give well rounded educational guidance to the students. National Board, Part 1, must be passed in order to receive clinical elective credit. One four week experience only counts toward clinical electives requirements. Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: Physical Diagnosis, Pathology and Pharmacology.

* Subinternship in Psychiatry : The student will function as an intern on the Adult and Child Psychiatric Services at the University of Kansas Medical Center and Kansas City VA Hospital. Each student will work closely with faculty and residents and will have an important role in the team care of hospital patients. The course is designed to provide a transitional experience between the predoctoral and residency stage of medical education allowing the student the opportunity to take more responsibility for patients with support and active teaching provided by faculty and residents.

* Subinternship–Plastic Surgery : This course is designed to provide advanced experience to medical students the diagnosis and management of plastic surgery patients. Additionally, concepts taught during surgery 900 are reemphasized in greater detail. Ward rounds, clinical conference seminars and care studies supplement the clinical experience. An optional laboratory experience providing in-depth introduction to microvascular surgery can be arranged. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of the principles and surgical anatomy of areas of plastic surgery including congenital, trauma, tumor and cosmetic. Students are expected to participate with the surgical team in the diagnosis and management of plastic surgery patients. It is expected that the student will participate, when possible, at a resident level of responsibility. The student participates directly in patient care on the wards, in the outpatient clinics and in the operation room.

* Subinternship in Surgery : The student will be expected to participate with surgical team in the diagnosis, operation, and management of surgical patients. It is expected that the student will participate, as possible, at a resident level of responsibility. Ward rounds, clinical conference, seminars, and case studies supplement clinical experience. The student participates directly in patient care on the ward, in the out-patient department, and in the operating room. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of alterations in physiology secondary to pathology, management of fluids and electrolytes, basic elements of pre- and post-operative care, and diseases amenable to surgical treatment. In addition, concepts taught during Surgery 900 are reemphasized and considered in more detail. We can accommodate 6 students in Modules I-XII.

* Surgery Subinternship–General, Garden City : This course is designed to provide advanced experience to the student in the management of surgical disease. The student is assigned to a surgical service at Garden City for four weeks. Student are expected to participate with the surgical team in the diagnosis, operation, and management of surgical patients. It is expected that the student will participate, as possible, at a resident level of responsibility. Ward rounds, clinical conference, seminars, and case studies supplement clinical experience. The student participates directly in patient care on the ward, in the outpatient department, and in the operating room. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of alterations in physiology secondary to pathology, management of fluids and electrolytes, basic elements of pre- and post-operative care, and diseases amenable to surgical treatment. In addition, concepts taught Surgery 900 are reemphasized and considered in more detail. We can accommodate 1 student in Modules I-XII.

* Surgery Subinternship–General, Hanover Kansas : This community based practice will demonstrate diversity in community medicine with heavy emphasis on diagnostic and therapeutic operative procedures. This course is designed to provide advanced experience to the student in the management of surgical disease. The student is assigned to two community physicians in Hanover Kansas for four weeks. It is expected that the student will participate, as possible, at a resident level of responsibility. Ward rounds, clinical conference, seminars, and case studies supplement clinical experience. The student participates directly in patient care on the ward, in the outpatient department, and in the operating room. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of alterations in physiology secondary to pathology, management of fluids and electrolytes, basic elements of pre- and post-operative care, and diseases amenable to surgical treatment. In addition, concepts taught during Surgery 900 are reemphasized and considered in more detail. We can accommodate 1 student in Modules I-XII.

* Surgery Subinternship–General, Manhattan Kansas : This course is designed to provide advanced experience to the student in the management of surgical disease. The student is assigned to a surgical service in Manhattan Kansas for four weeks. Students are expected to participate with a community surgeon in the diagnosis, operation, and management of surgical patients. It is expected that the student will participate, as possible, at a resident level of responsibility. Ward rounds, clinical conference, seminars, and case studies supplement clinical experience. The student participates directly in patient care on the ward, in the outpatient department, and in the operating room. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of alterations in physiology secondary topathology, management of fluids and electrolytes, basic elements of pre- and post-operative care, and diseases amenable to surgical treatment. In addition, concepts taught during Surgery 900 are reemphasized and considered in more detail. We can accommodate 1 student Modules I-XII. Prerequisite: SURG 900 and MED 900.

* Surgery Subinternship–General, McPherson Kansas : This course is designed to provide advanced experience to the student in the management of surgical disease. The student is assigned to a surgical service in McPherson Kansas for four weeks. Students are expected to participate with a community surgeon in the diagnosis, operation, and management of surgical patients. It is expected that the student will participate, as possible, at a resident level of responsibility. Ward rounds, clinical conference, seminars, and case studies supplement clinical experience. The student participates directly in patient care on the ward, in the outpatient department, and in the operating room. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of alterations in physiology secondary to pathology, management of fluids and electrolytes, basic elements of pre- and post-operative care, and diseases amenable to surgical treatment. In addition, concepts taught during Surgery 900 are reemphasized and considered in more detail. We can accommodate 1 student in Modules I-XII.

* Surgery Subinternship–General, Salina Kansas : This course is designed to provide advanced experience to the student in the management of surgical disease. The student is assigned to a surgical service in Salina Kansas for four weeks. Students are expected to participate with a team of community surgeons in the diagnosis, operation, and management of surgical patients. It is expected that the student will participate, as possible, at a resident level of responsibility. Ward rounds, clinical conference, seminars, and case studies supplement clinical experience. The student participates directly in patient care on the ward in the outpatient department, and in the operating room. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of alterations in physiology secondary to pathology, management of fluids and electrolytes, basic elements of pre- and post-operative care, and diseases amenable to surgical treatment. In addition concepts taught during Surgery 900 are reemphasized and considered in more detail. We can accommodate 1 student in Modules I-XII.

* Surgery Subinternship–Neurosurgery : This course is designed to provide advanced experience to the student in the management of neurosurgical problems. The student is assigned to the neurosurgical service at the University hospital for four weeks. Students will participate with the surgical team in daily rounds, diagnosis, out-patient experience, operative experience and post-operative management of neurosurgical patients. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of neurologic disease with special emphasis in physical exam and dia gnosis, management of basic neurosurgical emergencies and management of common neurosurgical problems. Accommodates three students in Modules I-XII.

* Surgery Subinternship–Urology : This course is designed to provide advanced experience to the student in the diagnosis and management of genitourinary disease. The student is assigned to the Urology Service at KUMC or the VA Hospital for 4 weeks. Students are expected to participate with the urologic patients. It is expected that the student will participate, as possible, at a resident level of responsibility. Ward rounds, clinical conference, seminars and case studies supplement clinical experience. The student participates directly in patient care on the ward, in the out-patient department, and in the operating room. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of alterations in physiology, secondary to pathology of the genitourinary tract, and diseases amenable to surgical or medical treatment. The student is expected to become familiar with the diagnostic procedures and techniques used in evaluating patients with acute and chronic genitorinary problems (i.e. cystoscopy). The out-patient experience is particularly emphasized. By the end of the clerkship, the student should be able to describe risk factors, epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, management strategy, prognosis, including sequelae, and preventive measures for common urologic problems. We can accommodate two students at KUMC and two students at VAH. This will be offered in Modules I-XII.

* Subinternship–Orthopaedic Surgery : This subinternship is designed to provide advanced experience in the student in the management of surgical disease. The student is assigned to the orthopaedic surgical service at KUMC for four weeks. This subinternship involves the management of orthopaedic trauma. The student is expected to participate with the orthopaedic surgery team in the diagnosis, surgical treatment, postoperative management of orthopaedic trauma patients. The student is expected to be involved at a resident level in all aspects of these patients' care. They are expected to coordinate the trauma patient's care with the appropriate orthopaedic service as well as the trauma service. The student will participate directly in patient in the emergency department, operating room, intensive care unit and on the orthopaedic ward. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pre-op, inter-op care of the orthopaedic trauma patients. We can accommodate one student in each module.

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