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University of California Davis (School of Medicine )




UC Davis School of Medicine is one of five University of California medical schools in the State of California. Founded in 1966, the school graduated its first class of physicians in 1972. With facilities in Davis and Sacramento, UC Davis School of Medicine has a major impact in Northern California through education of new physicians, research activities, patient care and public service. The UC Davis School of Medicine ranked amonth the top 50 graduate programs for both research and primary care according to an annual survey published by U.S. News and World Report.

Faculty in the School of Medicine specialize in a wide range of basic and applied research, including those related to neuroscience, cancer biology, vascular biology, genetic diseases and functional genomics, health services, infectious diseases, nutrition, telemedicine, and vision science. In addition, faculty are engaged in innovative collaborations both within the UC Davis community and with several affiliated research institutions, including the Shriners Hospital for Children, Vertans Affairs Health System, USDA Western Human Nutrition Research Center and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of five University of California medical schools in the State of California. Founded in 1966, the school graduated its first class of physicians in 1972. With facilities in Davis and Sacramento, UC Davis School of Medicine has a major impact in Northern California through education of new physicians, research activities, patient care and public service.

The school has 583 full-time faculty and nearly 1,800 volunteer clinical faculty who offer students individual attention and well-rounded clinical exposure. Leading teachers and researchers in their respective fields, School of Medicine faculty contribute generously to important advancements in medical practice while stimulating the development of improved medical technology.

Twenty-two faculty physicians from UC Davis School of Medicine were listed in the 1994-1995 edition of the Best doctors in America, a national reference directory based on a nationwide poll of leading physicians, and 99 faculty members were listed in the 1996 edition of The Best Doctors of the Pacific Region.

The School of Medicine maintains teaching, research and administrative facilities on the UC Davis campus while the majority of the School's clinical space is located in the medical center 17 miles to the east. The UC Davis campus and 135-acre medical center site continue to evolve as major clinical and research centers. Guided by a long-range development plan adopted by the UC Regents in 1989, the medical campuses have continued a course of unparalleled growth.

To accommodate development in medical research and clinical care, nine new clinical and support buildings have been constructed at the medical center in Sacramento since 1990. (Explore information on current and past construction projects on the facilities design and construction Web site.) Some of these new buildings include a new hospital tower, state-of-the-art Cancer Center; the Glassrock Building for pediatric, ENT, and Heart Center services; research buildings; and a facility for patient support services. A surgery and emergency medicine pavillion is under construction in addition to the new Center for Education and F. William Blaisdell Medical Library that is planned to open in late 2006, thus moving the School of Medicine across the street from the clinical teaching hospital.

An additional 900,000 square feet of space has been added by the completion of Tower II. The 475,000 square foot Ambulatory Care Center houses the specialty services, including the new Musculoskeletal Institute. The Research III building is designed for research at the molecular and cellular level and will house faculty from the Cancer Center and Departments of Medicine and Pathology. The Central Plant project will meet campus heating, cooling and electrical needs, eliminating the need for energy from outside utility companies.

The new flagship Shriners Hospital opened on the Sacramento campus in 1998 to care for children with orthopaedic disorders, burns and spinal cord injuries. The 350,000-square-foot facility, with its 35,000 square feet of research space combines Shriners' expertise with campus wide strengths in wound healing and tissue repair, offering tremendous opportunities for synergy in research, education, and patient care.

The UC Davis School of Medicine and Medical Center recognizes the fundamental importance of basic and clinical research studies as the basis for improving patient care and the treatment of disease.

The School of Medicine is committed and well-positioned to support biomedical research. The campus, which has both a medical and veterinary school in addition to a primate center, an agriculture college and a large division of biological sciences, offers a unique setting for collaborative research. Many of the latest advances in medical knowledge at the School of Medicine result from collaborations with colleagues from these UC Davis colleges and units.

Overall support for research activity at the School of Medicine totaled more than $42 million from 325 separate research projects. Basic researchers specialize in studies of cell growth, cell cycle, protein chemistry, membrane receptors, signal transduction, virology, gene transcription and neurobiology.

Areas of strength in basic and clinical research include HIV retrovirology, vaccine development, cancer diagnostics and therapeutics, cardiovascular and pulmonary medicine, wound healing and tissue repair, orthopaedics and advances in imaging technologies.

The medical center is also involved in a large number of multicenter clinical trails and large-scale epidemiological studies including the Women's Health Initiative, Ocular Hypertension Treatment trial and Violence Prevention Research Program.

Current research initiatives are building on these exceptional strengths to further develop UC Davis as a major health sciences center:

* With the endowment of the Albert Rowe Chair in Human Molecular Genetics, the school is substantially enhancing its expertise in the study of molecular medicine and human genetics, gene transfer and gene therapy. Eleven other endowed chairs and professorships have been developed over the past four years to support basic and clinical research.

* The new Lawrence J. Ellison Musculoskeletal Institute is a combined clinical care and research unit that will further develop UC Davis expertise in orthopaedic injuries and trauma, tissue repair, bone fatigue, and other areas of bone and connective tissue biology.

* The Center for Comparative Medicine, which is housed in a new $15 million building on the Davis campus, focus the expertise of researchers from the school of medicine, school of veterinary medicine and the primate center investigating diseases affecting both humans and animals.

The Human Nutrition Research Program, a partnership between the School of Medicine and the College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences that focuses on research in nutrition, life sciences and medicine, will be enhanced with the relocation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Western Human Nutrition Research Center from San Francisco to Davis.

The prominence and quality of School of Medicine researchers and physician faculty further the patient-care mission at the UC Davis Medical Center. As inland Northern California's only academic medical center and only level 1 trauma center, the medical center provides patients with access to the latest technological advances and investigational drugs and therapies.

As the main tertiary care referral center for a 32-county area of more than 5 million residents, the 452-bed hospital and 150-plus specialty clinics provide a diverse patient population for a well-rounded medical school education. Each year the hospital admits approximately 21,000 inpatients, while its clinics log more than 300,000 outpatient and emergency visits.

UC Davis Health System continues to support the growth of its multidisciplinary clinical centers. Each of these programs integrates broad areas of clinical and research expertise and offers a variety of multidisciplinary clinical programs featuring state-of-the-art care and leading edge research. Together they provide comprehensive care and essential services to the residents of Northern California.

The medical center is nationally recognized for a variety of its other programs, including the UC Davis Children's Hospital and UC Davis Cancer Center. The medical center also offers man services and programs that are unique to the region. These include a burn center, poison control center, hemophilia program, eye and tissue bank, skull base surgery program, limb salvaging/lengthening program, bone marrow transplant center, pancreas transplant program, computerized visual field research, cultured epithelial allografting, and pediatric oncology program.

UC Davis boasts of having some of the best student-run free clinics, organized and operated by students at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Patients are seen and worked up by medical students under the supervision of faculty preceptors. Medical students, postbac students and undergraduate pre-medical students may even receive academic credit. These clinics, established in the Sacramento and Davis areas, have long-standing and tremendous success in meeting a wide variety of patient needs.

UC Davis selects medical students who have both academic potential and the personal characteristics necessary for the study of medicine. Our students demonstrate an awareness of the demands of the profession, have developed skills in interpersonal relations, have demonstrated leadership potential, and show promise of serving the needs of people in our pluralistic society.

Year after year, a profile of our first-year medical students portrays strong diversity — in background, age and ethnicity. Recent surveys have ranked the UC Davis medical school among the top 25 schools nationwide in the number of ethnic minority admissions. And our student support services are here to ensure that all of our students have resources available to see them through to graduation.

In considering applications for admission, the Admissions Committee looks at the applicants' scholastic record; new Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) results; reports from teachers, advisers and interviewers regarding intellectual capability, motivation, emotional stability and personal dedication; and the applicants' awareness of the scientific, organizational, social and economic problems facing modern medicine. Selection criteria include academic credentials; personal traits including character, motivation, capacity for work; experiences in the health sciences, human services, or community; career objectives; and the individual's ability to make a positive contribution to society, the profession, the discipline, and the school.

We give preference to California residents and to applicants who are United States citizens or permanent residents.

Medical students at UC Davis may be members of the American Medical Student Association (AMSA) and the Student National Medical Association (SNMA), on both local and national levels, and may serve on statewide California Medical Association committees. Other organizations at the school include the California Chicano/Latino Medical Students Association, Filipino-Americans in Medicine, and the Native American Medical Students Association.

In addition, each class has a representative to the Organization of Student Representatives of the Association of American Medical Colleges (OSR-AAMC). One voting and one non-voting representative, chosen by the four class representatives, represent the UC Davis School of Medicine at all OSR-AAMC activities.

Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society members are chosen from third- and forth-year classes on the basis of scholarship, personal integrity, and potential leadership. Many physicians from the UC Davis School of Medicine are members of this national organization.

The UC Davis School of Medicine Alumni Association represents alumni of both the school and the medical center house staff. In addition to offering generous support for all student activities, the association provides support and career planning for the students. The association, which funds annual scholarships, also organizes class reunions, welcoming receptions for new students and house staff, and an array of social activities. It publishes an alumni directory and quarterly newsletter to foster communication among faculty, staff, students, graduates, and current and former house staff officers.

he UC Davis School of Medicine has 583 full-time faculty and nearly 1,800 volunteer clinical faculty who offer students individual attention and well-rounded clinical exposure. Leading teachers and researchers in their respective fields, School of Medicine faculty contribute generously to important advancements in medical practice while stimulating the development of improved medical technology.

Twenty-two faculty physicians from UC Davis School of Medicine were listed in the 1994-1995 edition of the Best doctors in America, a national reference directory based on a nationwide poll of leading physicians, and 99 faculty members were listed in the 1996 edition of The Best Doctors of the Pacific Region.

Founded in 1966, the School of Medicine maintains teaching, research and administrative facilities on the UC Davis campus while the majority of the school's clinical space is located in the medical center, 17 miles to the east.

The UC Davis campus and 135-acre medical center site continue to evolve as major clinical and research centers. Guided by a long-range development plan adopted by the UC Regents in 1989, the medical campuses have continued a course of unparalleled growth.

To accommodate development in medical research and clinical care, nine new clinical and support buildings have been constructed at the medical center in Sacramento since 1990. Some of these new buildings include a new hospital tower, state-of-the-art Cancer Center; the Glassrock Building for pediatric, ENT, and Heart Center services; three research buildings; and a facility for patient support services. A surgery and emergency medicine pavillion is under construction in addition to the new Medical Education Center that is planned to open in late 2006, locating the School of Medicine across the street from the clinical teaching hospital.

An additional 900,000 square feet of space has been added by the completion of Tower II. The 475,000 square foot Ambulatory Care Center houses the specialty services, including the new Musculoskeletal Institute. The Research III building is designed for research at the molecular and cellular level and will house faculty from the Cancer Center and Departments of Medicine and Pathology. The Central Plant project will meet campus heating, cooling and electrical needs, eliminating the need for energy from outside utility companies.

The new flagship Shriners Hospital opened on the Sacramento campus in 1998 to care for children with orthopaedic disorders, burns and spinal cord injuries. The 350,000-square-foot facility, with its 35,000 square feet of research space combines Shriners' expertise with campus wide strengths in wound healing and tissue repair, offering tremendous opportunities for synergy in research, education, and patient care.

UC Davis is one of nine campuses of the University of California, which was chartered as a land grant college in 1868 and now constitutes the pre-eminent system of public higher education in the country. Together, the nine campuses have an enrollment of some 173,000 students, 90 percent of them California residents. Some 150 laboratories, extension centers, research and field stations strengthen teaching and research while providing public service to California and the nation. The collections of the more than 100 UC campus libraries are surpassed in size in the United States only by that of the Library of Congress.

A variety of housing options is available to UC Davis medical students. Whether you choose to live on or off campus, you are urged to begin your housing search early. The recommended time to make housing arrangements for fall is during the preceding spring or early summer. You should plan to give yourself several days to explore the housing situation. If you need to stay in a hotel or motel while looking for a place to live, be sure to make our reservations well ahead of your arrival date.

As provided by the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act of 1998, you are entitled to request and receive a copy of the Security Report for the University of California, Davis, campus. The report includes statistics for the past three years concerning crimes and incidents reported to campus security authorities (whether the crime occurred on campus, in off-campus buildings or property owned or controlled by the university, or on public property adjacent to campus). The report also provides campus policies and practices concerning security Ð how to report sexual assault and other crimes, crime prevention efforts, policies/laws governing alcohol and drugs, victims assistance programs, student discipline, campus resources, and other matters.


School name:University of California DavisSchool of Medicine
Address:One Shields Avenue, Med. Sci. 1C, Rm. 104
Zip & city:CA 95616 California
Phone:530-752-0331
Web:http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/medschool
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School of Medicine Courses


FIRST YEAR

Starting in the fall, the first-year program is spread over three quarters. Classes include the basic sciences, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, histology, endocrinology, neurosciences, immunology and general pathology and social sciences (the behavioral aspects of medicine). Students also enroll in a "Doctoring" practicum, where they learn to communicate with patients, perform physical exams, and practice components of emergency medicine, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

COURSES :

* Doctoring I
* Molecular and Cell Biology
* Cell & Tissue Biology
* Genetics
* Gross-Radiologic-Development Anatomy
* Human Physiology
* General Endocrine & Pathology
* Pharmacology
* Immunology
* Microbiology
* Metabolism-Endocrine-Reproduction-Nutrition

SECOND YEAR

The second year extends over four quarters and includes an abbreviated six-week summer quarter, which provides a transition between basic and clinical sciences. Students learn about systemic pathology, the integumentary system, the reproductive system and physical diagnosis. They continue their training in physical diagnosis throughout the second year in "Doctoring-2". In the summer and fall quarters, students complete their training in the basic sciences (pharmacology and microbiology). And, from an organ systems approach, they are presented the pathophysiological basis of disease (clinical endocrinology, hematopoietic-lymphoreticular, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, respiratory, musculoskeletal, nephrology and clinical neurosciences). Courses in psychopathology and nutrition, are offered in the winter and spring quarters respectively.

COURSES :

* Doctoring 2
* System Pathology
* Pharmacology
* Neurobiology
* Cardiology
* Hematology
* Oncology
* Neurology
* Pulmonary
* Muscoloskeletal
* Gastrointestinal
* Dermatology
* Nephrology
* Psychiatry

THIRD YEAR

The third year program consists entirely of required clerkship rotations in the clinical specialties of surgery (8 weeks), medicine (8 weeks), OB/Gyn (8 weeks), pediatrics (8 weeks), psychiatry (8 weeks) and primary care (8 weeks).

COURSES :

* Internal Medicine
* Surgery
* Pediatrics
* OB / GYN
* Psychiatry
* Primary care
* Doctoring 3

FOURTH YEAR

The fourth year of the M.D. program features built-in flexibility to allow students to individualize their medical careers. Each student, with his/her advisor, will submit his/her proposed fourth year schedule, a minimum of 36 weeks of learning activities, for approval by the Fourth Year Oversight Committee. These learning activites may be selected from electives and may include 4 weeks special study module.

COURSES :

* Doctoring 4
* Special Study Modules
* Electives

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