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Case Western Reserve University (School of Medicine)




Since its founding in 1843, the School of Medicine has been at the vanguard of medical education and research. Already a leading educational institution for more than a century, in 1952 the school defined the medical degree curriculum of the future by integrating the basic and clinical sciences, focusing on organ systems, featuring an introduction to patients and clinical work in the first year, and creating a collegial environment for faculty
and student interaction. Most other medical schools ultimately followed suit.

Building on a strong tradition of innovation in education, in 2002 Case entered into an agreement with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation to launch the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University to train physicianinvestigators.
In 2004, the first class matriculated into the only M.D. program in the country with an integrated 12-month
research curriculum.

And now, beginning with the class entering in 2006, the School of Medicine once again is delineating the medical school curriculum of tomorrow by uniting the disciplines of medicine and public health in the University Program. This curriculum will not simply reform medical education but will shift existing paradigms to reinvent it, in the process challenging the medical profession to re-imagine itself as responsible not just for the care
of patients with disease, but also for the prevention and control of diseases in individuals and communities, and ultimately for the health of people in the United States and across the globe.

The students at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine represent a diverse group. Our medical students are men and women with various ethnic and racial heritages, interests and educational backgrounds who come from all over.
Many of them majored in the biological sciences as undergraduates, and others had majors such as history, computer science or engineering. For instance, Shernett Griffiths studied biology at Hampton University in Virginia. Saad Mahmood earned a bachelor of science degree in biochemistry, with honors, and a bachelor of arts degree in chemistry, at Case Western Reserve University. He also minored in economics. Ovidiu Marina came to medical school with three degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, two bachelor’s degrees – one in brain and cognitive science, and the other in electrical engineering and computer science – and a master of engineering degree in artificial intelligence. Kelly Morrissey majored in history and science, focusing on European history and chemistry, at Harvard. Kevin Tan graduated with distinction with a double major in biology and chemistry at Cornell University. Shibani Mukerji earned a bachelor of science degree in biology, concentrating on neuroscience, at Yale University.

They come from various geographic regions. Shernett was born in Clarendon, Jamaica, but now considers West Haven, Connecticut, home. Saad originally was from New Delhi, India, but, having attended school at Case for several years, now considers Cleveland home. Ovidiu was born in Bucharest, Romania, and lived there until he was 11. Although he lived in Boston for more than a decade, he now says, “I feel at home at Case.” Kelly was born in Maryland, where her family now
lives, but she also has lived in South Carolina, Virginia and Massachusetts. Kevin was born in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, but grew up in the United States, where he has lived in Wisconsin, Massachusetts and Missouri. Shibani was raised in Phoenix but considers Cleveland home.

Our educational programs continue to receive accolades; in 2002, the School of Medicine became only the third institution in history to receive the best review possible by the authority that grants accreditation to U.S. and Canadian medical degree programs, the Liaison Committee on Medical Education.

Today, students can choose from three paths to obtain a medical degree at the School of Medicine: the University Program, the College Program, and the Medical Scientist Training Program.

The School of Medicine is initiating a revolutionary reform of medical education and the practice of medicine with its new University Program. The four-year curriculum unites the disciplines of medicine and public health into a single, integrated program that trains future physicians to consider the interplay between the biology of disease and the social and behavioral context of illness, between the care of the individual patient
and the health of the public, and between clinical medicine and population medicine. The syllabus interweaves four themes – research and scholarship, clinical mastery, leadership, and civic professionalism – to prepare students for the ongoing practice of evidence-based medicine in the rapidly changing health care environment of the 21st century.

The University Program seeks to create physician-scholars who are leaders in science, practice and health care policy. Students learn primarily through small group discussions, large group experiences, lectures, interactive anatomy sessions, clinical skills training and patient-based activities. The learning process is supplemented by a rich array of electronic and Web-based resources.

The environment encourages scientific inquiry and self-directed learning. Students are immersed in a graduate-school atmosphere characterized by flexibility, independent study and collegial interaction with faculty. Students complete in-depth, mentored research experiences based on their individual interests, with
the goal of understanding the scientific process so that they may critically read and analyze scientific literature and know how to formulate hypotheses. These lifelong learning skills are essential in both clinical and research-oriented practices. All students also receive mentoring and individualized career counseling as
members of one of four academic societies.

In typical programs, students begin their medical education by studying basic science at the molecular level, not fully aware of the relevance that this knowledge will have in their future education or how it relates to the actual practice of medicine. The University Program begins differently, however, with an
introduction to health and disease within the broader context of society. This introduction provides both a perspective and a framework for subsequent learning of biomedical and population sciences.

The second year of the University Program includes the
continuation of foundations courses, time to review for the first step of the U.S. Medical Licensing Examination, and a research block or a clinical block that incorporates basic science experiences. Flexibility characterizes the third year, which can include research or a clinical block that incorporates basic science experiences, as well as advanced clinical studies, in-depth seminars in medicine and health, and electives. The fourth year includes research (as applicable for each student), advanced
clinical studies and in-depth seminars in medicine and health.


School name:Case Western Reserve UniversitySchool of Medicine
Address:2109 Adelbert Rd.
Zip & city:OH 44106 Ohio
Phone:216-368-3450
Web:http://mediswww.meds.cwru.edu
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School of Medicine Courses


FIRST YEAR

In typical programs, students begin their medical education by studying basic science at the molecular level, not fully aware of the relevance that this knowledge will have in their future education or how it relates to the actual practice of medicine. The Western Reserve2 Curriculum begins differently, however, with a block called "Becoming a Doctor". This introductory block focuses on health and disease within the broader context of society. This introduction provides both a perspective and a framework for subsequent learning of biomedical and population sciences. Additional foundations courses in the first year shift the focus to basic science training closely linked to clinical experiences and interactions with individual patients.

COURSES :

Foundations of Medicine and Health :
* Block I Becoming a Doctor : The scholarly physician at the bedside & in the comunity.

* Block II The Human Blueprint : Endocrine, reproductive, development, genetics, molecular, biology, cancer biology.

* Block III Food to Energy : Gastrointestinal, nutrition, energy, metabolism, biochemistry.

* Block IV Homeostasis : Cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, cell regulation, pharmacology.

* Block V Host Defense & Host Response : Host defense, microbiology, blood, integument, auto-immune.

* Block VI Cognition, Sensation & Movement : Neurosciences, mind, musculoskeletal.


SECOND YEAR

The second year of the Western Reserve2 Curriculum includes the continuation of foundations courses and time to review for the first step of the U.S. Medical Licensing Examination.

COURSES :

* Continuation of Foundations of Medicine and Health and time to prepare for USMLE Step 1

THIRD YEAR

Flexibility characterizes the third year, which can include MD thesis research block or clinical blocks that incorporate basic science experiences, as well as advanced clinical studies, in-depth seminars in medicine and health, and electives.

COURSES

BASIC CORE I :
* Internal medicine.
* Surgery.
* Family medicine.

BASIC CORE II :
* Pediatrics.
* Women's health (OB/GYN)
* Psychiatry.
* Neuroscience

ADVANCED CORE :
* Intensive rotation

FOURTH YEAR

The fourth year includes MD thesis research (as applicable for each student), advanced clinical studies and in-depth seminars in medicine and health.

COURSES

* Research
* Advanced clinical studies and seminars in medicine and health

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